Schupack Family Dentistry
850 N Main Street Ext
Wallingford, CT 06492
(203) 269-4249

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Posts for: December, 2019

By Drs. Schupack & Becker Family Dentistry
December 25, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
LadyGagaWasntBornThisWay

Sometimes, looking at old pictures can really bring memories back to life. Just ask Stefani Germanotta—the pop diva better known as Lady Gaga. In one scene from the recent documentary Five Foot Two, as family members sort through headshots from her teen years, her father proclaims: "Here, this proves she had braces!"

"If I had kept that gap, then I would have even more problems with Madonna," Lady Gaga replies, referencing an ongoing feud between the two musical celebrities.

The photos of Gaga's teenage smile reveal that the singer of hits like "Born This Way" once had a noticeable gap (which dentists call a diastema) between her front teeth. This condition is common in children, but often becomes less conspicuous with age. It isn't necessarily a problem: Lots of well-known people have extra space in their smiles, including ex-football player and TV host Michael Strahan, actress Anna Paquin…and fellow pop superstar Madonna. It hasn't hurt any of their careers.

Yet others would prefer a smile without the gap. Fortunately, diastema in children is generally not difficult to fix. One of the easiest ways to do so is with traditional braces or clear aligners. These orthodontic appliances, usually worn for a period of months, can actually move the teeth into positions that look more pleasing in the smile and function better in the bite. For many people, orthodontic treatment is a part of their emergence from adolescence into adulthood.

Braces and aligners, along with other specialized orthodontic appliances, can also remedy many bite problems besides diastema. They can correct misaligned teeth and spacing irregularities, fix overbites and underbites, and take care of numerous other types of malocclusions (bite problems).

The American Association of Orthodontists recommends that kids get screened for orthodontic problems at age 7. Even if an issue is found, most won't get treatment at this age—but in some instances, it's possible that early intervention can save a great deal of time, money and effort later. For example, while the jaw is still developing, its growth can be guided with special appliances that can make future orthodontic treatment go quicker and easier.

Yet orthodontics isn't just for children—adults can wear braces too! As long as teeth and gums are healthy, there's no upper age limit on orthodontic treatment. Instead of traditional silver braces, many adults choose tooth-colored braces or clear aligners to complement their more professional appearance.

So if your child is at the age where screening is recommended—or if you're unhappy with your own smile—ask us whether orthodontics could help. But if you get into a rivalry with Madonna…you're on your own.

If you have questions about orthodontic treatment, please contact our office or schedule a consultation. You can read more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “The Magic of Orthodontics” and “Orthodontics For The Older Adult.”


By Drs. Schupack & Becker Family Dentistry
December 15, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: partial denture  
AnAffordableRPDCouldbetheAnswertoYourMissingTeethProblems

You would love to replace your missing teeth with dental implants. And for good reason — they're the best way to restore life-like, functional teeth. But there's one problem — implants and fixed bridgework (the next, best option) are financially out of your reach.

There's another viable option, though, that might fit your budget — removable partial dentures (RPDs). Similar to full dentures, RPDs replace only the missing teeth in a dental arch. And they're much less expensive than implants or bridgework.

RPDs are custom made to fit an individual patient and their particular missing teeth locations. Their frameworks are usually made of vitallium, a strong but lightweight metal alloy. With vitallium, the frame can be made thin enough not to be noticeable but still conduct sensation.

A pink resin or plastic that mimics gum tissue covers the frame, to which we attach prosthetic (false) teeth made of porcelain, glass-filled resin or plastic to precisely match the missing teeth locations. The RPD is held in place with small metal clasps that fit around remaining natural teeth.

RPDs are designed to minimize movement and avoid undue pressure on the gum ridges, which could accelerate underlying bone loss. In certain situations, though, the location of some missing teeth could complicate matters. If you're missing a tooth in the back where the appliance coverage ends, the RPD may not be as stable.

The solution, ironically, could be a dental implant placed strategically at the end of the RPD, where it connects securely with the appliance. You would only need one or two implants, which won't dramatically increase costs.

One thing to remember with an RPD: they tend to accumulate bacterial plaque, the trigger for both tooth decay and periodontal (gum) disease. That's why it's important to practice daily effective hygiene by cleaning the RPD and your remaining teeth and gums, as well as taking the RPD out at night.

A well-maintained RPD could last for many years. With this appliance you can still have functional teeth and a winning smile, even without implants.

If you would like more information on removable dentures, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Removable Partial Dentures: Still a Viable Tooth-Replacement Alternative.”


By Drs. Schupack & Becker Family Dentistry
December 05, 2019
Category: Oral Health
Tags: x-ray  
The21stCenturyPromisesBetterDentalDiagnosticswithConeBeamImaging

X-rays revolutionized dental care in the 20th Century. The same could happen in the 21st Century as cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) becomes a fixture beside the traditional x-ray machine.

CBCT made its debut in dental offices about a decade and a half ago. It utilizes the same invisible energy as traditional x-rays to create images of the face and jaw. But unlike traditional x-rays, which can only depict structures in the two dimensions of width and height, CBCT can create three-dimensional images in amazing detail.

The CBCT's x-ray projector rotates around a patient's head. As it emits a cone-shaped beam of x-rays, the device simultaneously collects anywhere from 150 to 599 distinct image views. It transmits these views to a computer that assembles them into three-dimensional images that can be viewed on a computer display.

From the data file of images, dentists can re-format a variety of views and angles of teeth, jaws and other facial bones at various levels of magnification. Because of this wide range of views, all in striking detail, CBCTs are highly useful among other things for diagnosis of malocclusions (bad bites), the size and location of infections, obstructions at possible implant sites, or jaw problems prior to surgery.

Because they expose a patient to higher doses of radiation than a standard x-ray machine, they're normally limited to more complex oral situations. That means you'll still undergo standard x-rays for most of your dental treatment needs. CBCT radiation levels are lower, however, than medical CT scans, which use a fan-shaped beam that can expose a patient to ten times the radiation of a CBCT. For dental care, a CBCT machine also produces greater image detail than an MRI.

Depending on your needs, CBCT may one day be a part of your dental care.  With their range and accuracy, it could play a major role in helping you attain good health.

If you would like more information on cone beam diagnostics, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Getting the Full Picture with Cone Beam Dental Scans.”